LittleBlueCar's 12 Book Challenge

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LittleBlueCar's 12 Book Challenge

Post by LittleBlueCar on Mon Jan 04, 2016 3:54 pm

January 2016



Starting my 12 with a book that will last all year!
Not sure about you but im pretty useless at keeping new year's resolutions or sticking to the changes i want to make in my life, because i often want to make them all in one go and then end up burning out or losing heart.

Anyway, i found this great book that's been published just in time for new year.
It's a collection of a 365 little things you can do each day to make a difference and bring you wellbeing.

It's not a Christian book (as far as i know), so it's not overtly faith-filled. But it has 100s of ideas you can do day by day, or by just opening at any page.

Each day has a quick thought or an idea of something you can do to make an improvement in your life that day. From going and filling your fruitbowl to help you make healthier snack choices, to finding a unique way of recycling 1 thing that day, to listening to a piece of music you wouldnt usually, taking a walk round the block for 5-mins, or taking the time to talk to a stranger you cross paths with.

Looks like it's on the Aslan site too: http://www.aslanchristianbooks.com/The-Book-of-You-Daily-Micro-Actions-p/9781405924139.htm

Here's a page preview!:
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Re: LittleBlueCar's 12 Book Challenge

Post by LittleBlueCar on Fri Mar 04, 2016 8:56 am

Ooops, im a bit behind on posting about this - sorry!!

I'm still going with my book from January, but that'll last me all year, and its good because when i forgot i can just do 2-3 in one go?...

February's book was 'The Bad Christian's Manifesto' by Dave Tomlinson.
I'd read his first book 'How To Be A Bad Christian' a few years back and really enjoyed it. This follow on one was good, but did kind of re-hash the first a bit, but with some added ideas and thoughts, and looking at things from different angles. I'd really recommend both if you're tired of feeling like you miss the mark as a Christian.

Here's a video about it:
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Re: LittleBlueCar's 12 Book Challenge

Post by LittleBlueCar on Thu Apr 14, 2016 9:17 am

For March I read the Dreaming The Bear from Aslan's February Picks list. Seemed like a bit of a random book to include in their list, so I figured it must be worth a go.

Obviously, as the Feb Picks description mentions, it's a Young Adults fiction title, so geared for a bit younger than me, but I didn't mind that. Made it a nice and easy read (I like it when you get books you can read quickly and feel all accomplished - makes up for the ones it takes your years to finally finish!).

I've got to be honest, it took me a while to get into it.
Not only is the setting - a snowy Yellowstone National Park - not somewhere I have any connection with to be able to picture or relate to. But the format of the book itself, alternating between reality and a dreamlike state just 'happens' so you have to adjust to it before you really get into the flow of the book.
And the book leaves you with a bit of an unsettling feeling a lot of the time. Not only because of the dangers involved when it comes to wild bears, but also from what Darcy is experiencing. I don't know whether it's just my experience working with young people with mental health issues that clouded my reading a little. But I found the dissociative dream-like states and Darcy's family life a bit... concerning.
Most of my reading was spent thinking 'this isn't healthy'.

That aside, I really enjoyed Mimi's book.
Whether it's the rise in youtube videos of pets doing amusing things, or our fascination with things we don't quite understand; there seems to have been a rise in media portraying animals as main characters, or relationships between humans and animals.
I like that although the novel explains various facets of hibernation, medicine, and science, they're woven into the storyline so that the remainder can be focused elsewhere. The interactions in the book aren't based on scientific interest or study, but relationship. Relationship with wildlife and with nature itself, which is something today's screen-led youth are sincerely missing out on.
It also has a strong moral message about the bonds of family, and the importance and value of truth. Although Darcy's secret kept throughout the book could have had the potential to put her in serious danger, in the end, she find that the burden would have been shared had she have communicated her needs and her fears with those around her. She would have been loved and not judged. And that's a really important message for our teens to get, so I love that Mimi raises this without it being an in-your-face moral story teenage literature sometimes falls to.
I hope that youngsters reading Dreaming The Bear get a new-found appreciation for the world around them; a desire to explore; to see; and a need for connection with other creatures in a very stripped back way where they can find their value in caring for and being around animals instead of in consumerist lifestyles. It's very basic, but very important, and plays a huge part in our children and teens growing into confident, trustworthy, and brave individuals.


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